Monthly Archives: March 2014

No really, bossy is gendered.

My post on the gendered use of the word bossy has gotten a lot of attention in the past week. In it, I presented a modest bit of data to support Sheryl Sandberg’s campaign attempting to raise awareness of the obstacles

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Posted in Ideology and social change, Language and gender

What I imagine the future Museum of Classism’s exhibit on language elitists will say

Despite the naïve pretensions of utopic meritocracy held by many of the era’s commentators, we now know that the early twenty-first century was one marked by intense inequalities in its inhabitants’ well-being and life opportunities. Indeed, in many ways this era’s incredible

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Posted in Ideology and social change, Language and social class, Prescriptivism and language prejudice

Some data to support the gendered nature of “bossy”

Recently, public figures like Sheryl Sandberg and Ariana Huffington have been calling attention to the labeling of young girls’ behaviors and particularly how the labels are often differently applied to young girls but not young boys. In particular the word bossy

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Posted in Ideology and social change, Language and gender

What they mean when they say “religious freedom”

This December, I went back to the town I grew up in for a brief visit. While there, I noticed a bunch of signs like the one above. They confused me at first, considering that I know the town to

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Posted in Language and politics, Media discourse and media bias

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