Blog Archives

Banning whose words?: Coverage of the Chick-fil-a ‘slang’ ban and Ban Bossy

Perhaps my least favorite thing about internet journalism is its ability to endlessly generate non-news by summarizing and linking to what people write on social media sites like reddit and Twitter. This past week, a friend pointed me toward one of these

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Posted in Language and gender, Media discourse and media bias

No really, bossy is gendered.

My post on the gendered use of the word bossy has gotten a lot of attention in the past week. In it, I presented a modest bit of data to support Sheryl Sandberg’s campaign attempting to raise awareness of the obstacles

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Posted in Ideology and social change, Language and gender

Some data to support the gendered nature of “bossy”

Recently, public figures like Sheryl Sandberg and Ariana Huffington have been calling attention to the labeling of young girls’ behaviors and particularly how the labels are often differently applied to young girls but not young boys. In particular the word bossy

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Posted in Ideology and social change, Language and gender

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