Blog Archives

Hearing skin color: The connections between language and race

What is race? What does it mean to be White, Black, Asian, Latina/o, or any other identifiable race? Most of us probably think of it as something marked on our bodies. It’s the pigment of our skin, the shape of

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Posted in Human migration, Ideology and social change, Language and race, Linguistic diversity, Prescriptivism and language prejudice

Linguistic diversity in the classroom (part 2): Multilingualism and academic writing

In my previous post, I presented my approach to balancing two competing needs: (1) preparing students who speak ‘nonstandard’ English to succeed as academic writers and (2) creating an environment that promotes respect for linguistic diversity among my students while

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Posted in Human migration, Language and education, Linguistic diversity

“Should the U.S. Make English The Official Language?” published on Splice Today

The online magazine Splice Today is running an article I wrote titled “Should the U.S. Make English The Official Language?” Here’s a preview: Debates over immigration policy quickly devolve into arguments over the degree to which immigrants’ presence within our society is

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Posted in Human migration, Linguistic diversity

Linguistic diversity in the classroom (part 1): African American English and academic writing

Summer is coming to an end. Many teachers in the US are preparing for a new school year (and some have already started). As I get ready myself to head back into the classroom, I’ve been thinking about the ideas

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Posted in Language and education, Linguistic diversity, Prescriptivism and language prejudice

English speaker, ‘oppressed’ by the presence of Spanish, sues Pima Community College

Higher education in the United States has been struggling to deal with issues of linguistic diversity for many years. On the one hand, the majority of US citizens are English speakers, and most of this majority are monolingual (having forgotten

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Posted in Human migration, Linguistic diversity

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