Blog Archives

Women are 2.87 times more likely than men to be called pushy

My post looking at gendered descriptions of Jill Abramson has generated a little bit of attention. Notably, The Atlantic posted an article by Olga Khazan titled “Pushy is used to describe women twice as often as men”, citing my work. I’ve been asked if

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Posted in Language and gender

Beyond bossy: More on our gendered characterizations of leadership and authority

You may have heard that Jill Abramson the former executive editor of the New York Times, was recently fired. I’ve been living the life of an academic hermit for the past couple of weeks, so thankfully Lynne Murphy (Reader in Dept. of Linguistics, University of Sussex)

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Posted in Language and gender, Media discourse and media bias

Do we talk and write about men more than women?

As I’ve been researching the gendered nature of bossy, I’ve gotten a lot of important feedback from fellow linguists, who have helped to strengthen the argument in favor of viewing bossy as a word that is applied to women and girls more than

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Posted in Language and gender

No really, bossy is gendered.

My post on the gendered use of the word bossy has gotten a lot of attention in the past week. In it, I presented a modest bit of data to support Sheryl Sandberg’s campaign attempting to raise awareness of the obstacles

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Posted in Ideology and social change, Language and gender

Some data to support the gendered nature of “bossy”

Recently, public figures like Sheryl Sandberg and Ariana Huffington have been calling attention to the labeling of young girls’ behaviors and particularly how the labels are often differently applied to young girls but not young boys. In particular the word bossy

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Posted in Ideology and social change, Language and gender

Are you even listening to me?: Miscommunication and the performance of attention

We spend a lot of time talking everyday, much of this in face-to-face communication (yes, even in spite of the rise of digital technologies). When we do so, we rely on the cooperation of another person. One way we expect

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Posted in Language and gender, Linguistic diversity, Miscommunication and communication difficulties

Communication skills for women: Profiting off of the marginalization of women in the workplace

We live in a world where men’s practices and ways of being are largely viewed as ‘the norm’. Women, to the extent, that they are even recognized as having practices and ways of being are seen as needing to fix

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Posted in Language and gender

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